Stormcaller Kickstarter

stormcaller Clare Thompson

It’s been a while since i’ve pushed a Kickstarter i’m really interested in on my blog, but i’ve been waiting for this particular project for almost a year. I’ve watching the creator, Clare Thompson work on each watercolour image with painstaking detail on her Instagram and just HAVE  to see the printed result.

Stormcaller Clare Thompson

The Passing of the Storm

Stormcaller Clare thompson

The Scream

The book will be called Stormcaller, a 96 page graphic novel about a well to do town visited by a series of increasingly terrifying disasters and how they ultimately react to the happenings.

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I’m sure anyone looking at the artwork from the project can see why i’m so excited for it to be funded! Go checkout her campaign here!

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Adventures in the 18th Century-Flintlock 1+2 

It’s been a while since I’ve written anything on here, partially because I’ve been finishing my own comic ‘The Trade’ and partially because I haven’t had as much time to read comics for a little while but as of late I’ve managed to squeeze a few more in. 

Today I’m going to talk about the series ‘Flintlock’ by Steve Tanner from Time bomb comics.


First of all I’d like to point out that very rarely do I buy action comics, partially because I love horror and fantasy work and partially because sometimes it can be really uncomfortable reading for a woman, I’d also like to make the point that I’m quite often weary of female characters written by men for similar reasons of uncomfortableness. Quite often I speak to comic writers who write female characters to appeal to the ever growing crowd of young women attending conventions and flooding comic book shops, usually as a cynical cash in rather than a nuanced representation of women and fairly often as a way of sneaking some pin up work  onto the cover to keep their male audience happy.

 I’m fairly happy to say that Flintlock doesn’t fall into those categories and in fact is a really refreshing read.

The books each have 3 characters with their own short stories split three ways in the books: Lady Flintlock whom the books are titled after, Shianti the pirate queen and The Clockwork Cavalier. I’m mostly going to focus on Shianti and Flintlock even though I really enjoyed Clockwork Cavalier (which also has my favourite art work by Ed Machiavello in the books)

I strongly believe that representation in the media has larger effects on society than is given credit. The philosopher Jaques Rancier in his book ‘The Politics of Aesthetics’ talks about how systems of privilege and oppression work primarily through the aesthetic, determining who has a voice and who is represented in society. It is not unreasonable to conclude that the aesthetic has both preserved a pecking order throughout history, but has also been used to challenge the status quo in the favour of the oppressed. It is with this theory in mind that I believe and support positive representation of oppressed races, genders and sexualities in mainstream and indie culture, as it contributes to change in our society and how people are viewed in our society. 

It is with my view on representation in mind that I will talk about the Flintlock books. I was thrilled when I saw that two out of the three characters were not only women, but also graced the covers as major characters rather than filler material, and I was even happier with their costuming and poses. The front cover of the first issue has both Shianti and Lady Flintlock, both stood in strong action poses, both fully clothed in period costume rather than in bikini variants, book two of Flintlock has Lady Flintlock astride her horse looking completely badass and powerful. 

The old adage is that ‘Sex sells’. It is very refreshing to see creators starting to ignore this, and providing varied characters for comic readers to look up to. When I say this it’s not that I believe that sexuality is bad, but rather that I believe that it shouldn’t be all that exists, nor should it be the only thing taken into consideration when formulating a character. Flintlock from the get go presents us with female characters who are defined by their actions rather than their sexual worth, and while a lot of work that depicts female characters staring passively into the distance, both Lady Flintlock  and Shianti stare us in the eye, confronting the reader and establishing power. 

The above panel is the first page that confronted me as I opened Flintlock 1, it’s extremely striking and sets the tone for the first story, which is of course Lady Flintlock, the story of a female highwayman. I will try not to go into too much depth story wise as I genuinely would like anyone who reads this to pick up a copy for yourselves, but the overall story between the two issues follows Lady Flintlock in her double life and centres a lot around the mysterious reasons she is a highwayman and the retaliations of the rich folk she steals from. The story overall reminds me a lot of an 18th century batman story, with a more sympathetic protagonist. The work is imaginatively written, staying within the confines of history but still generating excitement and flare and still having empowered female characters, something that is quite often lacking from period work.  Flintlock herself is a very interesting character, portrayed as both being very capable in a fight but also quick on her feet against adversity. It was interesting to me that the artist Anthony Summey didn’t shy away from showing Flintlock also taking a beating, this might sound like strange praise but too often are strong women beaten down in stories and suddenly powerless, this didn’t happen here, it was portrayed similarity to how a fight between two men might be.

I was genuinely slightly bummed when I finished Lady Flintlock in issue 2 as I wanted more answers about her background and intentions, I was however quite happy to see more of Lizzie in issue 2 and look forward to seeing more of their friendship in issue 3.


My personal favourite character out of the three title characters in Flintlock is Shanti (drawn by Lorenzo Nicoletta)

Her character design is interesting and it’s really cool that a woman of colour was put in such a place of power as a pirate queen. And to mention sexualisation yet again there is a lack of it in Shanti design, the poses  she’s in are strong and her costumes aren’t designed to show flesh, and as a woman of colour she doesn’t exist to be exotic or fetishised because of her background, she is surrounded by men who respect her ability and wisdom rather than as a damsel. 

As I previously stated I won’t go to much into the story lest I ruin it but Shanti is portrayed as an often brutal but also principled pirate captain with an extremely loyal crew. The Shanti stories have a far more dreamlike quality in the telling and despite being grounded in realism feel like a fantasy story at times. She’s shown as being very capable and using both her wits and prowess as a fighter.  while at times I found her methods violent and sometimes hard to look at  I also found myself respecting her logic and principles and agreed with her judgements if not her punishments. 

The enthusiasm for the subject matter of all three characters really seeps through the writing of Flintlock. Steven Tanner has clearly thought a lot about the the characters he’s created and you can really feel the love for them in the work. The history of the period has been thoroughly researched and I was delighted to find some of that research shared in both books, talking about the real women who were highwaymen and pirates. 

While the work isn’t without faults, I would say it’s nuanced and researched enough that the positives definately outweigh the negatives, I would possibly criticise Clockwork Cavalier for example as there are no women at all in the story bar two in the background of the first issue, while the stories are pretty short I would still expect more at least visible if not necissarily speaking but that is a fairly minor criticism.  But I think Flintlock is a series we’re intent shines through and I was I left feeling very positive about the work.

While some may argue that it’s problematic to praise work both written by and drawn by men about women I would argue that acceptance of women in a male saturated community needs male creators like Steve who are both welcoming and thoughtful towards female readers. I have had the pleasure of meeting Steve and attending several of the same conventions with him, and one of the draws of purchasing Flintlock for me was seeing so many young women and teenagers buying the Flintlock books and being respectfully catered to and  welcomed at his stall. I believe that seeing positive and varied depictions of women in comics, not to fill a niche but as quality work will encourage more women to be  involved in the creative side of the comic community. This is why I chose to review Flintlock and why I recommend it as a series to follow and support. 

Edinburgh Comic Art Festival-Pushinka

Another review of an ECAF purchase. Pushinka by Aimee Lockwood, based on the true story of the daughter of the Russian space dog Streaks who was given to the Kennedys in 1961.


I’m not a massive history buff, and my knowledge of American history is a bit sketchy at best sometimes but this book really caught my attention and left me feeling a little teary eyed at the end. 


I’ve previously bought comics off Lockwood because her art is so gorgeous, I love the traditional feel of her linework and her textured colouring. Pushinka is no exception, Lockwood sticks to a 60s USA nostalgic colour palette of red, white blue and orange alluding to to soviet colours subtly throughout, her linework captures the playful movements of Pushinka and adds a 60s advertisement kinda vibe Which plays into the propaganda that was happening at the time. 


Overall this comic was a lovely read and is a great addition to my indie library, Lockwood’s other comics are definitely worth checking out (I previously bought North Coast Plagues which I also recommend)  

Edinburgh Comic Art Festival- Kathryn Briggs 

Frisson Comics are currently exhibiting at the first ever Edinburgh Comic Art Festival with our first book and zines. While I’m here I’m doing some shopping for unusual comics to add to the collection. Of course Triskelion by Kathryn Briggs stands out. 

I was immediately drawn to the fine art quality of her work, reminiscent of the likes of Dave Mckean and Bill Sienkiewicz (the artists who originally got me into comics) 


Her work has a gorgeous mixed media approach, offering the reader a tactile engrossing experience in the work.  

I had an intriguing conversation with Briggs when buying her comics about her work. She explained to me that she originally trained in fine art and transitioned to comics because it removed the barrier between art and viewer, she also told me that she’s interested in exploring the idea of a feminine hero through her work (the definition of which society currently can’t decide on). Her work actually contains snippets of philosophy adding context and depth to the work which I love. 


Story wise the comic is based on three feminine characters and heavily based on Greek Mythology, with Circe and Athena being prominent characters. The story plays with traditional narratives and subverts the hierarchy of hero and villain, I’m intrigued to see where this goes with the next issue. 

Only real criticism I have is that the issues are fairly short, but with the effort and imagination put into the production this is understandable, I think this series would definitely benefit from a compiled graphic novel release when finished! 

In short, check out this author/artist/amazing person


You can see more of her gorgeous work and purchase prints/art/book here

Watch this space for more reviews! 

The Trade

My posting has gone to pot recently, partially because I’m currently working on the next book from Frisson Comics 


The Trade Which we are now funding via Kickstarter.

Like with our last book Take Only Photographs, Leave Only Footprints, we’re trying to create a unique horror experience for our readers, using inks and quills to get a very organic line and natural aesthetic to the story. 

I hope if this is any interest you might check out our campaign or even share it for us! This book is a must for indie comic fans 🙂 

Still Available!

We still have 13 out of 20 of our premium packages for those backing £20 or more to our Kickstarter campaign. The package includes a PDF copy of the finished graphic novel, a high quality printed physical copy and best of all; a custom A5 sketch by Katie, just for you and of absolutely anything you would […]

https://frissoncomics.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/still-available/